Headlines

Corsica Elementary Earns National Recognition

Corsica Elementary of Corsica, South Dakota has been selected as a 2010 National Title I Distinguished School and was honored during the 2010 National Title I Conference in Tampa, FL, January 30-February 3, 2011. The conference attracts more than 3,000 Title I professionals from across the country who gather to honor these schools, as well as to share best practices and learn about innovative education programs.

Title I is the largest federally funded, pre-collegiate education program in the country, providing more than $17 billion in federal aid to schools and districts serving students in poverty. The goal of Title I is to ensure that all children, especially those living in economically disadvantaged conditions, have the opportunity to receive a high quality education. Schools selected for national recognition must have a poverty rate of at least 35 percent for the selected year and have met or exceeded state standards for making adequate yearly progress for two or more consecutive years.

Corsica Elementary was selected by the South Dakota Department of Education for its outstanding performance in the following category
• Exceptional student performance for two or more years


The goals of the educators are to make sure all of the standards are taught at each grade level and that the students are fully prepared as they advance to the next grade. Teachers work to meet all students’ needs. The belief is that all students can learn. The staff works well together and is in agreement about what sound educational practices are and what works for the students.

The Corsica staff has many years of teaching experience as well as numerous hours of graduate course work and training to keep current with teaching practices. The parents, administration and community have made a commitment to early childhood education by offering a three-year-old preschool, four-year-old preschool and a full-time kindergarten class. The size of their classes allows teachers to work closely with all students. The dedication of their staff is obvious.

Technology is an integral part of instruction. Lap top computers are utilized by all grade levels to support and reinforce concepts. The elementary staff has been trained to use Smart boards as an effective method of instruction. Children enjoy the many ways Smart boards enhance and support the curriculum goals.

The Corsica School District was named a Distinguished School District for No Child Left Behind for the 2004-2005 school year. The Corsica Elementary School received the Blue Ribbon Award from the U.S. Department of Education.

Superintendent DeGeest said, “Our hard working students, their concerned parents, our dedicated staff and our school district as a whole should all be commended for their role in this accomplishment.”

The National Title I Distinguished School program began in 1986 is an annual recognition for Title I schools showing remarkable improvement and innovation. It is sponsored by the National Title I Association. To learn more about all National Title I Distinguished Schools and the other programs of the National Title I Association visit www.titlei.org.




Charging For Preschool Services

A number of school districts have been contacting the DOE inquiring about the possibility of charging for preschool.

The DOE believes there is no legal authority that would authorize schools to charge for preschool. Given the constitutional provision in Article VIII Section I, SDCL 13-28-5, and the fact that 13-28-35 contains a specific provision allowing districts to charge for adult education programs, it seems a statutory change would be necessary to allow districts to charge for preschool. This, of course, does not constitute a legal opinion and districts should consult their own legal counsel on such matters.

Another question posed was what would happen to districts that did charge for preschool. School district auditors would determine whether they believe a particular situation constitutes noncompliance with state law and could include an audit finding in the audit report if they believed it is appropriate.

FEES AUTHORIZED BY STATUTE:


13-28-22. Tuition charged for students not entitled to free school privileges of district. All nursery, kindergarten, elementary, and secondary students not entitled to the free school privileges of the district wherein they are enrolled may be charged tuition.

13-28-35. Tuition charges for adult education program. A school district operating an adult education program may charge tuition as determined by the school board, subject to the provisions of chapter 13-39.

13-29-19. Fee for students within five miles--Amount. A school district may charge a nominal fee for providing school bus transportation services to students whose residence is less than five miles from the school. The fee authorized by this section may be charged only to those parents who request school bus transportation services for their children. The amount of the fee shall be established by the local school board.

13-8-39.2. Authority to provide day-care for children of enrolled students. The school board may provide day-care services to the children of enrolled students and may charge a fee therefor.

13-8-50. After school programming for school children--Fee. The school board may provide before and after school programming for children who are of school age and are enrolled in a school within the district and may charge a fee therefor.




Supplemental Educational Services (SES) Spring Update

The number of students participating in SES during the 2010-2011 school-year has risen from previous years. There were approximately 8,500 eligible students and over 2,000 who participated. The state currently has 26 approved SES providers. Applications were recently accepted and reviewed for the 2011-2012 school year. A final list of providers will be available on the state website as soon as final decisions are made on the applications.




Public School Choice/Supplemental Educational Services End-of-Year Reports

Just a reminder: End-of-Year reports will be due soon. The templates will be emailed to district representatives soon and will also be available on the state website.

Please email or call Betsy Chapman at (605) 773-4712 or betsy.chapman@state.sd.us with any questions or concerns.




Family Engagement and Policy Summit

The Department of Education and the South Dakota Parent Information Resource Center hosted a Family Engagement and Policy Summit in Ft. Pierre.

School districts personnel, along with parents, attended the one day summit. The summit provided information on Title I Parent Involvement Policies, research on family engagement and the impact it has on student achievement, opportunities to network and share family engagement strategies and provided time for schools to review and revise their parent involvement documents.




Parent Involvement

Parent involvement improves student achievement. The evidence is consistent, positive, and convincing: families have a major influence on their children’s achievement. (Henderson and Mapp: A New Wave of Evidence). The South Dakota Parent Information and Resource Center is committed to equipping parents to be more involved in their children’s education. The SDPIRC provides a varied array of direct training and information resources designed to support parents in their active and effective involvement in their children’s education. From early childhood through high school, families make key contributions to student learning.

•Students whose families are involved in their learning earn better grades, enroll in higher-level programs, have higher graduation rates, and are more likely to enroll in postsecondary education.

•When parents are involved and take an active interest in what their children are learning, students display more positive attitudes toward school and behave better both in and out of school.

•Children do best if their parents are involved in a variety of roles in their learning such as: learning at home, volunteering at school, planning their children’s future, and taking part in key decisions about school activities and programs.

•Middle and high school students whose families remain involved in these ways make better transitions, maintain the quality of their work, develop realistic plans for the future, and are less likely to drop out.

•Children from diverse cultural backgrounds tend to do better when families and parents are involved. (Henderson, Mapp, Johnson, & Davies: Beyond the Bake Sale: The Essential Guide to Family-School Partnerships.)


When families are involved and join forces with the school to bridge the gap between home and school children do better in school. Parents are partners with educators in assuring students achieve and reach their potential. Involved parents are able to share information with their child’s educators that aid the teacher’s work in the classroom. The more the relationship between families and the school is a real partnership, the more student achievement increases. Parent involvement does make the difference. Well-informed parents can be more effective and productive partners.




Solid Foundations Program

Solid Foundation is a web-based process that guides a school team through 10 efficient and effective steps to:

•Assess the school community’s strengths and areas for improvement (including a review of Title I requirements for parent involvement.)
•Develop a two-year plan
•Implement the plan with abundant resources
• Provides a School Team with a structured process to increase parent involvement.
• Provides purposeful parent engagement that is linked to student learning.
• Provides rubrics for evaluating district and school parent involvement policies.


Solid Foundation offers evidence-based strategies that improve partnerships designed to:

•Strengthen family-school connections
•Engage parents in children’s learning
•Improve student academic and social learning


The Solid Foundation process is directed by the principal and a school team (a school-based team that include the principal, educator and parent representatives.) Staff from the South Dakota Parent Information and Resource Center acts as an External Partner and assist in facilitating the process. Solid Foundation improves student learning and school success by empowering parents and creating effective educational partnerships between home and school! For more information and a consultation of how the SDPIRC can assist your school in building a Solid Foundation parent involvement plan call 800-219-6247 or 605-347-6260. The Solid Foundation website can be found at www.adi.org/solidfoundation.




Title Spotlight

Christine Christopherson

Hello! My name is Christine Christopherson and I began working with the DOE on November 9, 2011. I work with Title I, Part A assisting with consolidated applications and conducting reviews. I have had the opportunity to spend the past few months on many reviews and visiting several districts. What a winter we have had!

My family has deep roots in the area. I graduated from Black Hills State University, and later graduated with my Master’s in Education from Minnesota State University, Mankato. I taught in Gillette, WY then in Minneapolis, MN before moving back to the Pierre area. I spent six years working for The Right Turn coordinating the Even Start Program and teaching at the SD Women’s Prison. I then took the position as Director of the 21st Century Program at Stanley County. Working with a wide variety of Title programs during my career made this a perfect position for me.

I am enjoying traveling around my home state providing technical assistance and getting to know the school districts that serve our children.


Shawna Poitra Hello. My name is Shawna Poitra. I work with Title I, Part A, School Improvement and School Improvement Grants. I also assist with the consolidated applications and reviews. I started with the DOE on November 24th, and have enjoyed my transition to the department.

I am originally from Mandan, North Dakota. The last two years I lived in New Jersey, and am happy to be back in the Midwest. I have a Bachelor of Education in Social Sciences from Minot State University and a Master’s in Education from University of North Dakota. I taught for 4 years in the Bismarck Public School District, and 2 years at Kent Place School, an all-girls college prep school in Summit, NJ.

My husband and I are glad to be in South Dakota. I look forward to working for the DOE and living in the Pierre area.




ED BITS

Life Skills Training

Elementary Level-Grades 3-4-5 or 4-5-6
Middle School Level – Grades 6-7-8 or 7-8-9
June 1 & 2, 2011 – Country Inn & Suites-Watertown


LifeSkills Training is a proven, highly effective, substance abuse prevention program designed to: provide students with the necessary skills to resist social pressures to smoke, drink and use drugs; to help them develop greater self-esteem, self-mastery, and self-confidence; to enable children to effectively cope with social anxiety; to increase their knowledge of the immediate consequences of substance use.

The Elementary level is for implementation in grades 3-4-5 or 4-5-6 and it consists of 8 lessons for each of the three years. The Middle School level is for implementation in grades 6-7-8 or 7-8-9 and it consists of 15 lessons the first year, 10 lessons the second year and 5 lessons the third year. A High School Level manual is also available.

Go to https://apps.sd.gov/Applications/DE49TrnTracker/Secure/AvailableClasses.aspx to register on-line or return registration information by May 17, 2011 to: Shari Wirkus, NE Prevention Resource Center, Human Service Agency, PO Box 1030, Watertown SD 57201

Email: shariw@humanserviceagency.org Phone: (605) 884-3524 Fax: (605) 884-3522




RtI Conference: Success for All Students

June 15-17, Ramkota RiverCentre, Pierre

Get an in-depth look at Response to Intervention and best practices for implementation K-12. Speakers include Wayne Callender, Partners for Learning; Dr. David Hulac, University of South Dakota; and Shannon Harken, Heartland Area Education Agency.

Participants will leave the conference with a clear understanding of the RtI model, best practices for implementation, behavioral intervention strategies, and ideas for managing complex change and building consensus.

Watch for more information to come or contact the Department of Education’s Special Education Programs at (605) 773-3678.




South Dakota Behavior Institute

June 28-30, Mitchell

This workshop provides schools with the opportunity to gain the knowledge and tools necessary to build positive, proactive and successful learning environments for all. Participants will learn the mechanics of behavior, gather ideas for more effective classroom management, discover behavior interventions that can be implemented for students at all levels, and build a school environment that deals proactively and positively with behaviors.

This training opportunity requires a three-part commitment from participating schools:
1) Attend the three-day training as a team with mandatory members including building principal, general and special education teachers.
2) Participate in three webinars as a team (Sept. 20, Nov. 15, 3rd date TBA)
3) Set up a time for behavior trainers to come to your school and provide all school staff with basic training (approximately two to three hours)

Cost is $20 per person. Current Positive Behavioral Interventions and Support school members get in free. Graduate and continuing education contact hours available. The workshop is hosted by the South Dakota Department of Education.

For information, contact Rebecca Cain at the Department of Education, (605) 280-3568 or rebecca.cain@state.sd.us.




Summer Education Conference
July 20-22, Ramkota RiverCentre, Pierre

Make plans to attend the Fourth Annual Summer Education Conference at the Ramkota RiverCentre in Pierre July 20-22. The two-and-a-half-day event features a Top 20 Training to help schools reach their full potential, as well as Shari Rusch Furnstahl, who will focus on reaching the hard-to-teach and creating a positive school culture. Michael Dorn will be returning. He will talk about how schools can reduce bullying and create an environment that's safe for all.

Registration fee is $80 and includes admission into all sessions, as well as breakfast and lunch on Wednesday and Thursday, and breakfast on Friday. Hosted by the South Dakota Department of Education.

Graduate credit is available. Be watching for information later this spring, or contact Becky Cain at rebecca.cain@state.sd.us with questions.




Training Opportunities for Homeless Liaisons and District Staff
Each month, the DOE emails district liaisons for students experiencing homelessness a listing of the webinar training opportunities for the month. This training is provided by the National Center for Homeless Education, the technical assistance center funded by the US Department of Education. The trainings are provided at no cost to all districts and to anyone wishing more information. The webinars are from one to one and one half hours in length. Some training sessions are directed toward social workers or counselors.

Additionally, several trainings have been recorded and posted on the NCHE website along with self-paced trainings and power points. The self-paced trainings range from 10-25 minutes in length. Training topics posted on the NCHE website can be accessed at any time. A list of self-paced and recorded webinars is listed below. You may take advantage of these training opportunities by going to this website http://center.serve.org/nche/web/s_p.php Also posted at the website are other resources.
• The McKinney-Vento Assistance Act: An Overview
• Homeless with Homework: An Introduction to Homeless Education
• Providing Equal Access: Enrolling Children and Youth Experiencing Homelessness
• Homeless Education and Title I: Collaboration and Compliance
• Help When You Need It: Information for Parents on how Schools can Help during Homelessness
• Supporting Unaccompanied Homeless Youth in Accessing Higher Education
• Determining Eligibility for McKinney-Vento Rights and Services
• McKinney-Vento 101: Knowing and Applying the Law
• Recruiting Your Team: Building Collaboration to Serve Homeless Students

If you need further information from the DOE, please contact Laura.Johnson-Frame@state.sd.us or 605-773-2491.




Recruitment of Committee of Practitioners Members
The committee needs to recruit more members to meet the requirements in the statutes. The committee has many positions filled and needs to fill others. The committee will need to recruit an additional parent, more than one school board member, and pupil service personnel. An article was placed in the September Title I Update seeking nominations to the committee. Members were asked to continue to recruit members and forward names to the DOE for follow-up.




COMING SOON: Monthly Title I Directors Call

Beginning the fall of 2011 the Department of Education will be sponsoring a monthly Title I call for Title I Directors in school districts. The purpose for the monthly phone calls will be technical assistance.




Funding



School Improvement Grant (SIG) Timeline

• State applications approved: Mar. 17, 2011
• Applications emailed to districts with Tier I and II schools: Mar. 18, 2011
• Live Meeting for application and grant requirements for districts with Tier I and II schools: Mar. 24, 2011- 3:00 CT
• Letter of intent due back to SD DOE for districts with Tier I and II schools: Mar. 25, 2011
• Tier III applications emailed to applicable districts (Mar. 29, 2011)
• Live Meeting for application and grant requirements for districts with Tier III schools (April 6, 2011)
• Technical Assistances provided (upon request)
• Applications due (45 days): May 2, 2011
• Review of applications
• SD DOE provides assistance to Districts to ensure all requirements are fully met
• Award announcement (within 3 weeks of submission date): May 23, 2011
• Pre-implementation activities immediately upon receiving the grant, but no later than the July 1, 2011.




Allowable Costs

According to OMB Circular A-87 Attachment B,#19 [the salary and fringe benefits of a district administrator (superintendent) cannot be charged to federal grants even if the administrator is providing title or special education support and is appropriately licensed]. The guidance is a little different as far as principals or assistant principals: Salaries for principals and assistant principals may not be charged to the federal grant; however, if an individual is employed as a part-time principal and part-time federal grants coordinator, the part-time federal grants position may be funded with federal grant monies. The individual must document the work with personnel activity reports as required by OMB circular A-87.

Contact Kris Harms, (605)773-6509 or kristine.harms@state.sd.us, with any questions.




Policy

Why Does Every Title I School Need an 1119 Assurance Statement?

STATUTE: Title I Part A, Section 1119 (i)
(i) VERIFICATION OF COMPLIANCE-

(1) IN GENERAL- In verifying compliance with this section, each local educational agency, at a minimum, shall require that the principal of each school operating a program under section 1114 or 1115 attest annually in writing as to whether such school is in compliance with the requirements of this section.

(2) AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION- Copies of attestations under paragraph (1) —

(A) shall be maintained at each school operating a program under section 1114 or 1115 and at the main office of the local educational agency; and

(B) shall be available to any member of the general public on request.


The district is responsible for making sure that each principal of a Title I school (either targeted assistance or schoolwide) sign a written statement of compliance with the provisions of section 1119. A copy of this written and signed statement must be on file at the individual school as well as at the main office of the district. This information must be available to the public upon request.

Compliance with this section will also be part of the on-site reviews conducted by the Office of Educational Services and Support for federal programs. The principal will be asked to provide the compliance verification statement as well as supporting documents. It is suggested that each principal start a file for this purpose.

The following items should be included in the file:
• Hire dates for Title I paraprofessionals and teachers
• Verification of high school diploma or GED
• Copies of transcripts to verify credit hours or degrees
• Copies of teaching certificates showing endorsements
These requirements are for Title I paraprofessionals and teachers. New staff must meet requirements before hire while existing paraprofessionals and Title I teachers must meet full requirements by Jan. 2006. In a schoolwide Title I program, all staff are considered Title I staff and therefore must meet the requirements of section 1119. In a targeted assistance school, only those staff actually paid with Title I funds are affected by the requirements.

Section 1119 also calls for all K-12 teachers of core subject areas to be highly qualified by the school year 2005-2006. The term ``core academic subjects'' means English, reading or language arts, mathematics, science, foreign languages, civics and government, economics, arts, history, and geography. The state must develop a plan to assure this and each district must also devise a plan. Therefore, part of the district’s needs assessment for the consolidated application should be to determine the status of all of its core subject area teachers, K-12. The results of the needs assessment of teacher and paraprofessional qualifications should also be kept in the folder for documentation of compliance with section 1119.

Compliance issues that must be assured:
• All Title I paraprofessionals have at least a GED or high school diploma.
• All Title I paraprofessionals hired after Jan. 7, 2002 met requirements of 1119 prior to hire.
• All Title I paraprofessionals have met the requirements of section 1119 calling for an associate degree, 48 college credits, or passage of the state test (ParaPro).
• All Title I teachers hired after the first day of school, 2002, highly qualified.
• All Title I teachers are highly qualified.
• All teachers teaching core subject areas are highly qualified.
• The district has set aside 5% (unless a lesser amount is needed) of its Title I allocation to meet the needs of staff under section 1119, unless a lesser amount is needed.





Sample Assurance Statement

I, _____________, principal of _____________ school, _____________ district, hereby assure that all staff in this school have met the requirements outlined in section 1119 of Title I Part A. All Title I paraprofessionals have met requirements of 1119 calling for an associate degree, 48 college credits, or passage of the state test (ParaPro). All Title I teachers are highly qualified. All teachers teaching core subject areas are highly qualified. _________________________ (signature) __________________ (date)




Targeted Assistance VS. Schoolwide

Although many similarities exist between Title I Targeted Assistance and Schoolwide programs, there are also significant differences. It is especially important that schools that have recently moved or are moving from Targeted Assistance to Schoolwide be aware of these differences and address them as they develop school Title I plans and submit information for the Consolidated Application.

Download Target Assistance VS. Schoolwide chart at http://www.doe.sd.gov/oess/newsletter/2011/april/documents/TAvSW.pdf/

School Plans and the Consolidated Application

School plans should reflect the actions to be taken by school staff that comply with Title I federal requirements and meet the needs of students. While many of the actions taken by Targeted Assistance schools are the same as those taken by Schoolwide, there are significant differences between the two programs, as indicated by the chart above.

Some examples are:
• Targeted Assistance programs should focus primarily on the quality instruction provided by the Title I teacher, either working with a small group of eligible students within the classroom or in a pull-out program. The description of the Targeted Assistance program must address effective scientifically research-based instructional methods and strategies that strengthen the core academic program of the school and align with general classroom instruction/curriculum.

Example of how this could be reflected in the Consolidated Application: In addition to the literacy block within the classroom, Title I students will receive 30-40 minutes of additional intensive one-on-one or small-group reading instruction using research-based literacy intervention materials. These intervention programs were selected by Title I and classroom teachers after a review of research on effective reading intervention programs. These resources will be purchased with Title I Targeted Assistance funds.

• Schoolwide programs should focus primarily on meeting the needs identified in the comprehensive needs assessment. The description of the Schoolwide program must address effective scientifically research-based instructional methods and strategies that strengthen the core academic program of the school.

Example of how this could be reflected in the Consolidated Application: Teachers provide additional in-class small group instruction for both reading and math for students who are not on grade level. For students who are still not making adequate progress in the regular classroom, before- and after-school tutoring, and Summer School are offered. Students also receive additional support during the school day and in summer school through ______, a computer-based program that reinforces reading skills.

District teams of teachers have met over the past four years and analyzed core and intervention programs. After holding school-based discussion groups regarding the materials, a district selection of core programs was made. The district funded the core programs; teachers in Title I schools have selected supplemental and intervention programs that they determined best met the needs of their students.

• Targeted Assistance programs should involve parents to the extent possible in program planning and evaluation, but the focus should be on their involvement in the Title I student’s education, required parent involvement activities, and family literacy.

• Schoolwide programs must provide evidence of whole-staff and parent involvement in program planning and evaluation, as well as academic involvement, required parent involvement activities, and family literacy.

• Professional development with Targeted Assistance funds is used for staff that support Title I students and is aligned with Title I students’ needs.

• Professional development in Schoolwide programs is for all staff to support all students and is described in the Schoolwide plan.





Resources



eGrant Training for First Time Users

Monday, May 2, 2011, 3 p.m. (CDT)

This meeting will be for those who are new to the eGrant system. The focus of this presentation will be how to maneuver through the system explaining how sections work together; how to get a login and password; and how information is received through the system. You are invited you to attend an online meeting using Live Meeting.

Join the meeting at https://www.livemeeting.com/cc/stateofsd1/join?id=S4ZJ9Q&role=attend Audio Information
Telephone conferencing

Choose one of the following:
• Start Live Meeting client, and then in Voice & Video pane under Join Audio options, click Call Me. The conferencing service will call you at the number you specify. (Recommended)
• Use the information below to connect:
Toll-free: +1 (866) 410-8397
Participant code: 6057734716

First Time Users:
To save time before the meeting, check your system at http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=90703 to make sure it is ready to use Microsoft Office Live Meeting.

Troubleshooting
Unable to join the meeting? Follow these steps:
1. Copy this address and paste it into your web browser:
Join the meeting at https://www.livemeeting.com/cc/stateofsd1/join?id=S4ZJ9Q&role=attend
2. Copy and paste the required information:
Meeting ID: S4ZJ9Q

If you still cannot enter the meeting, contact support at http://www.webconferencesupport.com/.

Notice

Microsoft Office Live Meeting can be used to record meetings. By participating in this meeting, you agree that your communications may be monitored or recorded at any time during the meeting.






Consolidated Application 2011-12

Tuesday, May 3, 2011, 3 p.m. (CDT)

This meeting will be to discuss the information included in the consolidated application, any changes to questions that have been made and to field questions participants may have.

Join the meeting at https://www.livemeeting.com/cc/stateofsd1/join?id=S4ZJ9Q&role=attend
Audio Information
Telephone conferencing

Choose one of the following:
• Start Live Meeting client, and then in Voice & Video pane under Join Audio options, click Call Me. The conferencing service will call you at the number you specify. (Recommended)
• Use the information below to connect:
Toll-free: +1 (866) 410-8397
Participant code: 6057734716

First Time Users:
To save time before the meeting, check your system at http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=90703 to make sure it is ready to use Microsoft Office Live Meeting.

Troubleshooting
Unable to join the meeting? Follow these steps:
1. Copy this address and paste it into your web browser:
https://www.livemeeting.com/cc/stateofsd1/join
2. Copy and paste the required information:
Meeting ID: S4ZJ9Q

If you still cannot enter the meeting, contact support at http://www.webconferencesupport.com/.

Notice

Microsoft Office Live Meeting can be used to record meetings. By participating in this meeting, you agree that your communications may be monitored or recorded at any time during the meeting.






LEA Annual Title I Report Meeting

Thursday, May 5, 2011, 3 p.m. (CDT)

This meeting will be for those who are new to the eGrant system. The focus of this presentation will be how to maneuver through the system explaining how sections work together; how to get a login and password; and how information is received through the system. You are invited you to attend an online meeting using Live Meeting.

Join the meeting at https://www.livemeeting.com/cc/stateofsd1/join?id=S4ZJ9Q&role=attend.
Audio Information
Telephone conferencing

Choose one of the following:
• Start Live Meeting client, and then in Voice & Video pane under Join Audio options, click Call Me. The conferencing service will call you at the number you specify. (Recommended)
• Use the information below to connect:
Toll-free: +1 (866) 410-8397
Participant code: 6057734716

First Time Users:
To save time before the meeting, check your system at http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=90703 to make sure it is ready to use Microsoft Office Live Meeting.

Troubleshooting
Unable to join the meeting? Follow these steps:
1. Copy this address and paste it into your web browser:
https://www.livemeeting.com/cc/stateofsd1/join
2. Copy and paste the required information:
Meeting ID: S4ZJ9Q

If you still cannot enter the meeting, contact support at http://www.webconferencesupport.com/.

Notice

Microsoft Office Live Meeting can be used to record meetings. By participating in this meeting, you agree that your communications may be monitored or recorded at any time during the meeting.



Give your students online study tools

Online study tools can be an important option for your students. They should not be the only choice, of course, since some students may not have a computer at home. But they can help boost student achievement whenever students have the option to get online--at home, at the library or in the classroom.

Two of the best-known online study tools are Quizlet and Quia. (Quia requires a subscription; Quizlet is free.)

Quizlet allows you to:
• Make online flash cards that are similar to traditional paper flashcards.
• Keep track of students' answers. It allows students to go back and try again on their incorrect answers.
• Create a variety of quizzes, including short answer, true and false, matching and multiple choice.
• Create games that allow students to test themselves while racing against a clock.


If your school provides a subscription, consider Quia (Quintessential Instructional Archive). Quia contains features that let you search for material other teachers have created, and to collaborate with other teachers in your own school.

Reprinted with permission from the May 2011 issue of Better Teaching® (Elementary Edition) newsletter. Copyright © 2011 The Teacher Institute®, a division of NIS, Inc. Sources: Quizlet, "FAQ: How do I make flash cards on Quizlet?" http://quizlet.com/faqs/faq-how-do-i-make-flash-cards/ and Quia, "Take a look inside Quia Web," www.quia.com/quicktour.html.




Help ELL students put words on paper

Writing can be a complex developmental process for any student. For an ELL student, it's all the more daunting. Here are some ways you can help:

• Begin with drawing. Most students enjoy creating artwork. For an ELL student, drawing can become the first form of written communication.
• Model work of students who are slightly ahead in the process. Let the ELL student know that these students once started the same way. But they are making progress--and so can he.
• Have the student write in his native language to practice getting words down on paper. This is an important part of the process and the concept should not be lost.
• Take dictation. Ask the student to dictate to you. Write down what he's saying, but use proper grammar and sentence structure. Explain any of the changes or corrections you have made.

Reprinted with permission from the May 2011 issue of Better Teaching® (Elementary Edition) newsletter. Copyright © 2011 The Teacher Institute®, a division of NIS, Inc. Source: Katharine Davies Samway and Dorothy Taylor, Teaching English Language Learners: Strategies That Work, ISBN: 978-0-439-92647-8, Scholastic.




Boost comprehension and word recognition skills with rereading

"Read it again, Sam." With apologies again to Humphrey Bogart in Casablanca, that advice can help students improve their word identification skills. But how can you get students to read something a second, third or even fourth time?

Here are some ideas:

• Read to somebody else. Spend 10 minutes giving each student a chance to read aloud with a partner, switching off after five minutes. You can rotate around the room, listening to different students each time.

• Read to something. Do you have a pet in your room? Ask a student to "Read a story to our guinea pig." Or bring in a big stuffed animal who will be a willing listener.

• Record the reading. Use an audio recorder or a video camera to record the student reading a selection aloud. As a bonus, these recordings can be shared with parents who cannot get to your classroom.

• Use sentence strips. Cut a story into sentence strips and give a student two or three sentences. Read one sentence aloud and ask the student to find the correct strip. Then have the student read it back to you. Or give the student three or four sentences to put in the correct order.

Reprinted with permission from the May 2011 issue of Better Teaching® (Elementary Edition) newsletter. Copyright © 2011 The Teacher Institute®, a division of NIS, Inc. Source: Linda Higbee Mandlebaum et al., "Get Students to Read it Again," Intervention in School and Clinic, May 2007, Hammill Institute on Disabilities.





Contact

JANET RICKETTS
Office of Educational Services & Support Director
Phone: 605-773-6400
Email: janet.ricketts@state.sd.us
DR. KRISTINE HARMS
NCLB Title Team Leader - Title I Director
Phone: 605-773-6509
Email: kristine.harms@state.sd.us
DAWN SMITH
Title I Part A
Phone: 605-773-2535
Email: dawnl.smith@state.sd.us
JENIFER PALMER
Title I Part C & Title I Part A
Phone: 605-773-4437
Email: jenifer.palmer@state.sd.us
BETSY CHAPMAN
Title I Part A
Phone: 605-773-4712
Email: betsy.chapman@state.sd.us
BETH SCHILTZ
Title I Part A
Phone: 605-773-4716
Email: beth.schiltz@state.sd.us
LAURA JOHNSON-FRAME
Title I Part D & Homeless & Title I Part A
Phone: 605-773-2491
Email: laura.johnson-frame@state.sd.us
SHANNON MALONE
Title III
Phone: 605-773-4698
Email: shannon.malone@state.sd.us
CHRISTINE CHRISTOPHERSON
Title 1 Part A
Phone: 605-773-8067
Email: christine.christopherson@state.sd.us
SHAWNA POITRA
Title I Part A
Phone: 605-773-8065
Email: shawna.poitra@state.sd.us
ROB HUFFMAN
Grants Management
Phone: 605-773-4600
Email: robyn.huffman@state.sd.us
PAUL SCHREINER
Grants Management
Phone: 605-773-7108
Email: paul.schreiner@state.sd.us
KIM FISCHER
Grants Management
Phone: 605-773-3171
Email: kim.fischer@state.sd.us