TITLE I PROGRAM INFORMATION:

Title I Summer School Reports are due

Title I Summer School Reports are due upon completion of your summer program. The reports can be mailed or faxed to Christine Christopherson, Department of Education, 800 Governors Drive, Pierre, SD 57501 or 605-773-3782. The link to the reports are as follows: Title I Summer Program Summary Report Title I Summer School Program Summary (http://doe.sd.gov/oess/documents/SummerPrg.doc) & Title I Summer School Grade Report Title I Summer School Grade Report (http://doe.sd.gov/oess/documents/SummerGrR.xls).

Reminder: If you had a program in June and July or August there should be a separate report completed as June falls in a separate fiscal year. Questions can be directed to 605-773-8067.




Suggested Title I Target Assistance Program Timeline

August:
• Determine maximum case load.
• Determine how instruction will be administered (pull-out, in-class, before-school, after-school, combination of these).
• Conduct student selection process. If done last spring, add any new students.
• Notify parents of student eligibility.
• Create a welcome letter for parents informing them of the Title I components. Include the parent involvement policies and parent-school compact with the correspondence.
• Prepare and distribute information to classroom teachers explaining the purpose of Title I, the regulations pertinent to Title I, and the importance of collaboration and cooperation with the Title I program.
• Document that the instruction and programs used within Title I are based on research and meet the definition of scientifically-based research.


September:
• Create a fixed schedule of times in which Title I students will be served.
• Communicate with the classroom teachers to determine what form of supplemental instruction will be provided to each student to support what is happening in the classroom.
• Serve students who are eligible for Title I and whose parents did not decline services.
• Conduct Annual Parent Meeting.
• Send meeting minutes to those parents who could not attend.
• Send home information to Title I parents as to how they can support their child’s education at home and at school.


October:
• Communicate with the classroom teachers to determine what form of supplemental instruction will be provided to each student to support what is happening in the classroom.
• Assess Title I students (quarterly).
• Report assessment results to parents using a Title I progress report.
• Send home information to Title I parents as to how they can support their child’s education at home and at school.
• Plan/conduct parent involvement activity.


November:
• Communicate with the classroom teachers to determine what form of supplemental instruction will be provided to each student to support what is happening in the classroom.
• Send home information to Title I parents as to how they can support their child’s education at home and at school.
• Plan/conduct parent involvement activity.


December:
• Communicate with the classroom teachers to determine what form of supplemental instruction will be provided to each student to support what is happening in the classroom.
• Send home information to Title I parents as to how they can support their child’s education at home and at school.
• Consider when/how students will be dismissed from services if achievement warrants.


January:
• Communicate with the classroom teachers to determine what form of supplemental instruction will be provided to each student to support what is happening in the classroom.
• Send home information to Title I parents as to how they can support their child’s education at home and at school.
• Assess Title I students (quarterly).
• Report assessment results to parents using a Title I progress report.
• Plan/conduct parent involvement activity.


February:
• Communicate with the classroom teachers to determine what form of supplemental instruction will be provided to each student to support what is happening in the classroom.
• Send home information to Title I parents as to how they can support their child’s education at home and at school.
• Plan/conduct parent involvement activity.


March:
• Communicate with the classroom teachers to determine what form of supplemental instruction will be provided to each student to support what is happening in the classroom.
• Assess Title I students (quarterly).
• Report assessment results to parents using a Title I progress report.
• Send home information to Title I parents as to how they can support their child’s education at home and at school.
• Plan/conduct parent involvement activity.


April:
• Communicate with the classroom teachers to determine what form of supplemental instruction will be provided to each student to support what is happening in the classroom.
• Send home information to Title I parents as to how they can support their child’s education at home and at school.
• Conduct Annual Assessment of Parent Involvement and Title I (surveys).
• Survey classroom teachers to gather input for your Annual Review Meeting.
• In middle school or secondary school Title I programs, consider surveying your Title I students to gather their thoughts and opinions on the title I program.


May:
• Communicate with the classroom teachers to determine what form of supplemental instruction will be provided to each student to support what is happening in the classroom.
• Send home information to title I parents as to how they can support their child’s education at home, at school, and over the summer.
• Consider when/how students will be dismissed from services if achievement warrants. • Conduct Annual Review Meeting.
• Notify parents of the results of the Annual Review Meeting through a newsletter, sending minutes, etc…
• Prepare final progress reports on the achievement of your Title I students. Distribute these reports to Title I parents.
• Conduct student selection process for the following school year (if applicable).
• Complete and submit the LEA Annual title I Report to the state Title I office.


Schoolwide Programs The No Child Left Behind Schoolwide guidance requires that Title I Schoolwide Programs complete an annual review of program effectiveness. The plan’s implementation and outcomes must be evaluated to determine whether the academic achievement of all students improved. Determine whether the goals and objectives contained in the plan were achieved and if the plan is still appropriate as written.

Each schoolwide building must keep evidence on file that a schoolwide review process has occurred. This evidence should include names of persons involved in the review process, meeting minutes, and a rubric scoring sheet. If it is determined through the review that changes need to be made to the schoolwide plan, to keep the plan current the changes should be documented as part of the review process.

If you need assistance please contact Dawn Smith at 605-773-2535.




Title I Parent Notification Requirements

Document Recipient Timeline
Title I Eligibility
A notice to parents informing them of student eligibility for Title I services and giving parents the opportunity to decline services
Title I parents in targeted assistance schools Annually (Fall)
Parent Involvement Policy
The parent involvement policy describes all Title I parent activities, meetings, trainings, and other opportunities for involvement that will be offered to Title I parents. Parents should receive district and school level policies.
Title I parents Annually (Fall)
Parent-School Compact
This is a jointly developed account of the partnership between the school, parents, and students for improving student achievement of state academic standards.
Title I parents Annually (Fall)
Title I Parent Meeting
Parents must receive notice that the Title I program will host a required meeting detailing parents’ rights, the program intent, the services that will be provided, the Title I curriculum, assessments that will be used administered, an overview of the Title I parent involvement policy, and the parent’s right to refuse services and provide feedback on the Title I program.
Title I parents Annually (Fall)
District and School Report Cards
Parents must receive a notice regarding the availability of the entire district and school report cards, which review the achievement of all students and specified subgroups of students. The DOE template printed with district information on one side and school information on the other meets the notification requirement.
All parents Annually (Fall) within 30 days of school start date
Individual Student State Assessment Reports
Parents must receive the report that identifies the level of their child’s achievement results from the South Dakota State Assessment.
All parents Annually (Fall)
Report of AYP Status
A copy of the school’s AYP report must go out to parents along with a description of what AYP means and the current status of the school in terms of AYP. The AYP report reviews the school’s annual progress on the state assessments to determine if AYP is being met and to identify schools and districts in need of improvement. DOE template includes this information
All Parents Annually (Fall)
Schools Identified for Program Improvement, Corrective Action, or Restructuring
A district must notify parents if they have been identified as a Program Improvement school. This notice must contain the following information: (1) an explanation of what the identification means, (2) a comparison of how the school compares academically to other schools in the district and state, (3) the reasons for identification, (4) what the school is doing to raise achievement, (5) how parents can be involved in addressing academic problems, (6) opportunity for school choice, (7) opportunity for supplemental services, (8) descriptions (if applicable) of corrective action and restructuring plans.
All parents Once schools receiving title I, Part A funds are identified for Program Improvement (14 days prior to the start of school)
Notice of Parent Right To Request Teacher and/or Paraprofessional Qualifications
Parents must receive a notification of their right to request information on teachers’ qualifications. If such a request is made, parents should receive information on whether teachers meet state certification requirements for the grade level and subjects they’re teaching, whether they are teaching via provisional waiver or emergency permit, their degree major and field of discipline as well as any graduate certification they hold. If their child receives any services from a paraprofessional, parents should also be notified if the paraprofessional has met paraprofessional qualifications.
All parents in Title I-funded schools Annually (Fall)
Complaint Procedures
Parents must receive notification of the complaint procedure the school has in place if there were to be complaints about federally funded programs.
All parents in Title I-funded schools Annually (Fall)





EDUCATOR RESOURCES:

Differentiated Instruction: Bloom's Taxonomy helps differentiate

Assign a reading. Then use Bloom's Taxonomy to differentiate responses to the reading, ranging from the most concrete to the most abstract.

Check for students':
• Knowledge. Ask students to answer basic questions such as the name of the author or the names of several characters.
• Comprehension. Ask students to summarize the story.
• Application. Have students use learning styles. For example, a visual learner could draw a picture or diagram of a key point.
• Analysis. Ask students to compare the book with another one they've read.
• Synthesis. Have students transform a passage spoken by a key character into poetry.
• Evaluation. Ask students to examine a decision made by a key character. Then write about a choice they might have made in those circumstances.
Bloom's Taxonomy has undergone a revision in the last decade, but whichever version you use, it's a great framework for differentiating instruction.

Reprinted with permission from the June 2011 issue of Better Teaching® (Elementary Edition) newsletter. Copyright © 2011 The Teacher Institute®, a division of NIS, Inc. Source: Char Forsten et al., The More Ways You Teach, The More Students You Reach: 86 Strategies for Differentiating Instruction, ISBN: 1-884548-93-8, Crystal Springs Books




Working Together: Collaboration = higher achievement

In some schools, every door is closed. But when the doors are open (figuratively, at least) and teachers collaborate with one another, students learn more.

That's just one of the big findings from a recent MetLife Survey of the American Teacher. Two-thirds of the teachers in the survey said that greater collaboration among teachers would have a major impact on student achievement. Nine out of 10 said that their own success in the classroom depended at least somewhat on the other teachers in their building.

Most teachers say they spend at least some time working with other teachers. Typically, elementary teachers say they work with others on their grade-level team, spending an average of 2.7 hours weekly.

Here are some suggestions on ways teachers can get the greatest benefit from collaborating with peers:
• Observe other teachers. Invite other teachers to observe you. The survey found this to be the least frequent type of collaboration in most schools. Yet watching someone else address the same issues can often give you insights into a new approach to try in your own teaching.
• Collaborate beyond your grade level. Talk with teachers at the next grade about how prepared students should be to do the work at their grade level. Are there things you could change to be sure that students have those skills?
• Use technology to collaborate with teachers in another school. Tools like SkypeTM and ePalsTM can make it easier for teachers to collaborate even if they never see one another in the teacher's lounge.
Reprinted with permission from the June 2011 issue of Better Teaching® (Elementary Edition) newsletter. Copyright © 2011 The Teacher Institute®, a division of NIS, Inc. Source: "Collaborating for Student Success: The MetLife Survey of the American Teacher, 2009,"




Math Skills: Actually, they do need to memorize math facts

Cognitive scientists are learning more about how students learn. One thing they now know about math may not make students happy. It turns out that memorizing basic facts is critical.

Learning math requires three kinds of knowledge. Students need to know: 1) facts, 2) procedures and 3) concepts.

But the facts come first. Any complicated math problem has simpler problems contained within it. Calculating the answer to those basic problems requires a certain amount of brain power--of working memory.

But when students already know a set of basic facts, they can free their working memories to focus on the higher-level math problem. In other words, the less working memory your students need in order to multiply 7 times 8, the more likely they will be to solve the equation in which that problem is embedded.

Does this mean that students should only drill on a set of basic facts? Far from it. Knowing that multiplying a negative number by another negative number results in a positive number is not the same as knowing why.

Still, for students to free their brains to do the kind of deeper conceptual thinking that is involved in most middle and high school math, they need to know some things cold.

Reprinted with permission from the June 2011 issue of Better Teaching® (Secondary Edition) newsletter. Copyright © 2011 The Teacher Institute®, a division of NIS, Inc. Source: Daniel T. Willingham, "Is It True That Some People Just Can't Do Math?" American Educator, Winter 2009-2010, American Federation of Teachers.




RULES & REGULATIONS:

Know your NCLB reporting requirements

No Child Left Behind requires school districts to publicly report accountability and assessment results for the district and each of its schools. It also requires schools to provide individual student results to parents. These are three separate reporting requirements.

To help facilitate the distribution of these reports, the South Dakota Department of Education has created a template that may be used to report most of the required data for both the Accountability and Assessment Reports. This Excel template will be found (early August) at http://doe.sd.gov/oess/TitleI.asp#sec1111, under the document section titled NCLB Reporting Template and as a link under the Section 1111 supporting documents. It will also be located on the Accountability/AYP link on the main DOE page.

Distributing this template to parents will allow districts to meet all reporting requirements EXCEPT the display of the entire report district report card and each school’s report card where they are accessible to the public and the distribution of the individual student reports.

Accountability Report
The Accountability Report provides the public with information about student achievement on the Dakota STEP or Dakota STEP-A. It is based on the scores of students who were continuously enrolled in a single district from Oct. 1 to the last day of the testing window. This information is provided via the state’s online 2011 Report Card (FAY Math/Reading Scores tab).

Adequate yearly progress, or AYP, determinations are based on the scores of only those students who make full academic year (FAY).

Each Accountability Report must include:
(1) A comparison of student achievement at the district level and each school level with the state’s annual measurable objectives (or AMOs) in reading and math for the following student subgroups:
• all students
• ethnic groups
• students with disabilities
• students who are limited English proficient
• economically disadvantaged
• gender
• migrant students
(2) Participation rate for each of the subgroups listed above.

(3) Information about the academic indicators the district uses for AYP determinations. The indicator for high school is graduation rate, and the indicator for elementary and middle schools is attendance. Academic indicator information must be reported for each of the student subgroups listed above.

(4) AYP information, including the number and name of each school district and school identified for improvement, corrective action, or restructuring under NCLB

(5) Percentage of classes not taught by “highly qualified teachers” and disaggregated information including:
• Highest quartile of poverty schools not having classes taught by highly qualified teachers; and
• Lowest quartile of poverty schools not having classes taught by highly qualified teachers.

(6) Beginning with the 2009 Report Card, there is a new federal requirement to report the state’s National Assessment of Educational Progress, or NAEP, results. The most recently available NAEP results in grades four and eight on reading and math must be reported on district and state annual Report Cards.

Important to note: The information needed to report accountability will be available online via the State Report Card. (The link is not available at this time and will be published as soon as it is available.)

Assessment Report
The Assessment Report reflects the achievement of all students in a district or school – not just those who completed the full academic year. The Assessment Report must include Dakota STEP and STEP-A results in reading and math. Districts are required to report their science assessment data as well.
The Assessment Report must include the percentage of students tested and student achievement at each achievement level (advanced, proficient, basic, and below basic) for the following student subgroups:
• all students
• ethnic groups
• students with disabilities
• students who are limited English proficient
• economically disadvantaged
• gender
• migrant students
Districts must also report the most recent two-year trend data in student achievement for each subject and grade.

Distribution of Accountability and Assessment Reports
Districts must distribute both Accountability and Assessment Reports via several means to ensure that the broadest number of stakeholders receive the information. This distribution must be completed at the beginning of the school year.
Districts must report all of the required data. If a subgroup is less than 10 students, the report should indicate that the subgroup is not reported.
The following forms of distribution are required for both Assessment and Accountability Reports:
• Each report must be distributed to each parent in the district. NOTE: A district that sends a district newsletter to each postal box holder fulfills this requirement by providing all the required information in the newsletter.
• Each report must be distributed to the school board.
• Each report, including the colored bar graphs showing student proficiency from the department’s Web site, must be posted at the district office, each school office, and community locations such as the post office, library or community center.
In addition, the reports may be posted on the district’s Web site, along with links to the Department of Education’s accountability and assessment Web sites. The reports may be covered in the local newspaper – either completely or in a synopsis that directs stakeholders to Web sites for further information.

Helpful hint: The South Dakota Department of Education has created a template that may be used to report most of the required data for both the Accountability and Assessment Reports. This template will be found at: http://doe.sd.gov/oess/TitleI.asp#sec1111, under the document section titled NCLB Reporting Template and as a link under the Section 1111 supporting documents. It will also be located on the Accountability/AYP link on the main DOE page.

Individual Student Reports
Districts are required to provide individual student results on the Dakota STEP or STEP-A to parents, principals and teachers. School districts must deliver this information to these individuals within 30 calendar days of the beginning of the school term. This information is currently available through the student information system (via Infinite Campus) and also through the eMetric Web site at https://solutions1.emetric.net/sdstep/. If this link does not work, please contact the DOE for more information (For eMetric log-in information, contact Gay Pickner at the department.)

The department has a parent information piece that schools can use to help parents understand what their child’s test scores mean. You can find it at http://www.doe.sd.gov/oats/documents/DSprfctst.pdf.

Questions regarding NCLB reporting requirements can be directed to Dr. Kris Harms or your Title I program representative at the South Dakota Department of Education. Main number: (605) 773-6400


School District Educational Structures When working with Title I, the Educational Structure (Ed Structure) of a school district is very important. With many schools in South Dakota being housed in one building, it is important for districts to remember that they still have separate school designations and, as such, each school must meet Title I requirements. This includes Schoolwide plans, Parent Involvement Policies/Compacts, and Assessment & Accountability Reporting.

For example, a district’s Ed Structure may be PreK-5, 6-8 and 9-12. In this case, even though they are housed in one building, there are still three schools as far as programs go. If the PreK-5 Elementary operates a Title I program and the 6-8 Middle School operates a Title I program, they both need their own schoolwide plans, parent involvement policies and school compacts. The District would also need a separate district parent involvement policy, distinct from the individual school’s policy.

When reporting Assessment & Accountability information to parents, districts must report each school’s information, not just the district information. Even if all schools are in one building, districts must print out the individual school report card and, if the district uses the available reporting template, a separate template for each school.

The issue of Ed Structure also affects staffing. If your district has a K-8, 9-12 Ed Structure, the teachers of the K-8 students need an elementary certification and the 9-12 teachers need their core area certification. However, if you have (or change to) a structure such as K-6, 7-8 and 9-12 or K-4, 5-8 and 9-12, your teachers will need the middle school endorsements to teach the students at the middle school/junior high levels.




UPCOMING EVENTS

ELL DATA RETREAT
Aug. 10, 2011 - Ramada Inn, Sioux Falls

The South Dakota Department of Education is providing South Dakota educators an opportunity to attend an ELL Data Retreat that will be led by Jane Hill.

Jane Hill is employed by McREL and has many years of ELL experience. The data retreat allows school districts the opportunity to review their ELL student’s ACCESS test scores and give some ideas of what types of material/instructional strategies could be used to help the ELL students in your districts succeed. School Districts are asked to send a team of educators to the data retreat.

To register, contact Shannon Malone at shannon.malone@state.sd.us or (605) 773-4698.






Title Conference Calls

The State Title I Director will be conducting monthly conference calls for District Title I Directors/Coordinators. The phone calls will highlight current topics of interest or concerns that have been expressed by the state school districts. Each month, beginning in September, the second Tuesday at 2:00 will be the regularly scheduled time.




Common Core State Standards Initiative training

The Common Core State Standards Initiative is a state-led effort to establish a shared set of clear educational standards in English language arts and mathematics for grades K-12. It was launched by the Council of Chief State School Officers and the National Governors Association Center for Best Practices.

The Common Core Standards are designed to be robust and relevant to the real world, reflecting the knowledge and skills that young people need for success in college and careers.

Registration will stay open until Sept. 2, 2011. Once the registration window is closed in the fall, the state will review the numbers of participants to ensure every district that would like to participate can. Currently there are many seats that are open, but if registrations are above 150 per grade span per location, the state may need to make adjustments. If interested in the Common Core State Standards Initiative training, Go to: https://spreadsheets.google.com/viewform?hl=en&formkey=dEtuSld5NVQ3dzBmZVdfSzBmTGFyUnc6MA#gid=0 to register.

In late August you will receive an e-mail asking you to confirm your attendance and receive additional information about the workshop series.

Dates for 2011-12 Testing
WriteToLearn Sept. 1 - Apr. 30
DSTEP Fall Online Workshop Sept. 6-9
DSTEP-Alt Roadshow Jan. 9-12
DSTEP Roadshow Feb. 27 - Mar. 1
DSTEP-Alt testing window Feb. 6 - Mar. 16
DSTEP window April 2-20
ACCESS Feb. 6 - Mar. 9
8th grade technology test Apr. 23 - May 18





WIDA Professional Development

The South Dakota Department of Education will be providing two different workshops for districts who administer the ACCESS to their English language learner students. Information concerning these two workshops is below along with registration information.

September WIDA Professional Development
The S.D. DOE will provide educators from across the state a workshop about Differentiation: Instruction & Assessment for ELLs. This workshop is geared more towards teachers who are new to the ELL world.

The objectives for this workshop are:
• What is Differentiation? • How and where do we begin?
• Tips for Managing Differentiated Lessons
• Practice: Matching ELP Levels to Content
• Groups Share Plans for Differentiation

Ft Pierre; Sept 13; AmericInn
Brookings; Sept 14; SDSU Campus (Hobo Day Gallery)


Go to https://spreadsheets.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?hl=en_US&formkey=dHEwUmtmZVdrdDZMcFdRbVFuNm16REE6MA#gid=0 to register

October WIDA Professional Development
The S.D. DOE will provide educators from across the state a workshop about Writing for ELLs – Using the WIDA Framework.

Some of the objectives of this workshop are:
• Baker’s Dozen for supporting ELL writing
• Deconstructing the WIDA writing rubric
• Text structures & discourse patterns
• Collaborative Writing Assessment Protocol
• Issues in teaching writing

Sioux Falls; Oct 5th; Ramada (off Russell Street)
Ft Pierre; Oct 6th; AmericInn
Go to: https://spreadsheets.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?hl=en_US&formkey=dDlxaU5McEpoNnR6MUU1YWVrWVJZNWc6MA#gid=0 to register.




Parent Involvement Conference
Sept. 30 - Oct. 1, Sioux Falls

Go to http://doe.sd.gov/pressroom/educationonline/2011/july/documents/ParentCon.pdf to download flyer




Schoolwide Conference
Oct. 13, 2011 - Chamberlain

The South Dakota Department of Education will be hosting a Schoolwide Conference for eligible Targeted Assistance Title I schools planning to operate a schoolwide program. This conference is mandatory if a targeted assistance school will be planning and operating a new schoolwide program next year.

Three required steps to develop a schoolwide program

The first step is to participate in the schoolwide webinar that will explain the schoolwide process. Webinar-September 21 at 3:00 pm CST

The building principal, or designee, must participate in the webinar. Following the webinar he or she will share with school staff, parents, and community what is involved in developing a schoolwide program.

The second step is for the school to commit to spending the school year developing a plan. The schoolwide planning team will lead the school in the planning process.

The third step is to bring a team to the schoolwide conference. Title I staff are offering the schoolwide conference at the Americ Inn in Chamberlain October 13 from 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Each school planning to develop a schoolwide program must bring a team of at least four persons, consisting of an administrator, teachers(s) Title I staff, parent(s), and/ or community or board members.

Certain requirements must be met for a school to be eligible to operate a schoolwide program. A Title I school may operate a schoolwide program only if a minimum of 40 percent of the students in the school, or residing in the attendance area served by the school, are from low-income families. Schoolwide program planning begins with the formation of a planning team, which explores the benefits of establishing a schoolwide program, identifies strategies and goals, and presents a proposal to teachers, administrators, and others in the school community.

The schoolwide conference will be a working day for schoolwide teams to work with school support team and department staff to begin the process of developing their schoolwide plan.

The schoolwide guidance is available at: http://doe.sd.gov/oess/TitleI.asp#sec1114

Any questions contactDawn Smith at dawnl.smith@state.sd.us or (605) 773-2535.






Systems Change Conference
Oct. 19-21, 2011 - Spearfish

The 12th Annual Systems Change Conference will be held on October 19-21, 2011 at the Spearfish Holiday Inn and Convention Center.

Go to http://systemschange.midwestmaple.org/default.htm for more information.




National Title I Conference
Jan. 21-24, 2012 Seattle, WA

An annual project of the National Title I Association, the National Title I Conference is the premiere event for individuals working within the Title I program.

With hundreds of nationally recognized speakers and thousands of colleagues with whom to compare notes, this is the ideal place to further your knowledge about Title I programs, policies, and great ideas.

Sessions
Attendees have the opportunity to choose from more than 150 sessions featuring major names in education, newcomers who are rising stars in their field, key staff from the U.S. Department of Education, as well as other experts in a wide array of subject areas. Specific sessions and speakers will be identified in the "Schedule" section above as they are confirmed.

Cost
Full Conference Registration: $525 no price increase over last year One Day Registration: $299 no price increase over last year For more information: http://nationaltitlei.site-ym.com/page/T12OverviewA/?







South Dakota Math & Science Conference
Feb. 2-4, 2012

Go to the SDCTM website (http://www.sdctm.org/conference/annualconference.htm") for more information.